Creating your own online magazine

I am a creature of routine. I used to listen to Today on Radio 4 when I got up in the morning; now because I can’t stand the egos being pushed into my ears, I have a much more peaceful and indeed useful start to the day – after I’ve scanned The Guardian (online), BBC News (online) and Wales Online websites, and checked my email and other social media such as Google+ (alas – soon to be no more), WhatsApp, Twitter and less frequently than I used to – Facebook.

I’ll start at the beginning and describe what I do to curate my interests, my daily internet workflow. The jumping-off point is to check my RSS Feeds using Feedly. What is an RSS Feed I hear some of you say? Well it’s a signal from a website that new content has been posted on a website. So if there are a number of sites that you are interested in, you can get an alert with an extract of content sent to you by what is called a RSS Feed, which you can then pick-up and read in full using a RSS Reader. Now the favoured Reader for a long-time was Reader (from Google) – but as is their wont, Google “sunsetted” it. That is they killed it off. Fortunately a really good alternative came to the rescue in Feedly. Every time I come across a website I want to follow, I add it to my Feedly and, as long as a RSS Feed can be setup for the site, place it in a category for the feed (eg photography, or IT) so that my stream of reading is organised to some level. I could stop there, after all I’ve got the link to the webpage, it’s stored in a category and I can go back and read it anytime I’m online. However, what if I just want to scan quickly the content, and go back to it later, or what if I want to read it online? That’s where Pocket comes in.

If I see an article in Feedly that I want to read later, or even archive, I add it to my Pocket, giving it some tags to help me find it later. I do both of these tasks on a smartphone, or tablet, it’s much easier than using a desktop/laptop as there are good apps which work together for both Feedly and Pocket. Once in Pocket, the article, stripped of everything that is irrelevant, can be read offline – once it’s sync’d the content from the web to your device – or alternatively you can click on a button to read the original article online.

But then occasionally, I come across some content that I want to share more widely – to the Thought grazing community for instance; and for this I use Flipboard which is a really easy way of creating an online magazine; made up of articles (perhaps with comments added) which you found interesting. From my Pocket app, I just click on the Share button and select <Share via …> and chose Flipboard. On Flipboard I’ve created a couple of “magazines”, so I chose which one I want to “publish” the article to, and perhaps write a comment about the article; and then Post it. That’s all there is to it, but what do you need to do to replicate my workflow and produce something like this …

View my Flipboard Magazine.

Curating the web

Step 1 – create a Feedly account, and download the app if you’re going to use a smartphone, or tablet

Step 2 – select websites you want to get an RSS feed from [see above, or read What is an RSS feed?]

Step 3 – check periodically to see what has “popped-up” in your feed reader.

Saving for another day, or for off-line reading (bookmarking+)

Step 1 – create a Pocket account, and download the app if you’re going to use a smartphone, or tablet

Step 2 – save to Pocket from your browser (perhaps using a browser extension), or from a sharing icon in Feedly

Step 3 – tag your articles, and read at your leisure, or when you want to

Creating a magazine to share with others

Step 1 – create a Flipboard account, and download the app if you’re going to use a smartphone, or tablet

Step 2 – create a Magazine within your Flipboard account, and decide whether to make it Private or Public

Step 3 – add articles to your magazine from your Pocket app (as described above) , or from your web browser

Good luck!

You might like to comment on this?

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.